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Very Superstitious: Great horror has long exploited our most primal fears and turned superstitious beliefs into terrifying nightmares. 

One of the most popular movie genres for a long time has been that of horror movies. This can be attributed to a number of reasons. The best movies are able to evoke our emotions and nothing does this better than a horror flick. These movies also exploit superstitions that we have long believed helping to develop the movie plot.

The superstition surrounding the number 13 has long been used as an element in horror movies. This is especially true for the Friday the 13th franchise. With a total of twelve films, Friday the 13th is one of the most successful movie franchises ever. The date Friday the 13th has long been associated with bad luck. So fearful are some people that they avoid making certain plans on this date. The movie franchise capitalized on this fear using the event as their moniker.

Many people fear a black cat crossing their path which can be an omen of bad luck. This particular superstition was used as the premise around the 1981 horror movie, The Black Cat.  In the movie the lead character is a psychic who has the ability to communicate with the dead. He also is able to control the mind of his pet cat, who of course is black. The cat figures prominently in the movie as many accident victims have telltale scratches on them.

When Stephen King’s movie IT was released as a film early this year, it brought the fear of creepy clowns to the forefront of popular culture.  Pennywise the Dancing Clown resides in the sewer and lures children to come close. When they do, he of course harms them and pulls them down into the sewer. Clowns have long been an object of fear for many people helping to create the mood in this film.

There are many other superstitions that are part of various cultures. Looking into the background of these beliefs can be quite enlightening.


Editor’s Note: If you’re fascinated by the real life historical origins of our deepest cultural fears and superstitions, check out the amazing LORE on Amazon Prime. 

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